News

6/27–8/30: summertime… @ jenkins johnson gallery

Exhibition view, Summertime... at Jenkins Johnson Gallery,

Exhibition view, Summertime… at Jenkins Johnson Gallery. Two of my ribbon texts are on view alongside lovely ribbon-based wall works by Vadis Turner.

June 27–August 30, 2013
Summertime…

Jenkins Johnson Gallery
521 W. 26th Street, 5th Floor, New York, NY 10001
Summer gallery hours: Mon–Fri, 10am–6pm

Works by Shawn Huckins, Vadis Turner, and Christine Wong Yap. The exhibition features works of varying media and content, though all embody the dedication to contemporary art and mastering their media that Jenkins Johnson Gallery strives to propagate.

Christine Wong Yap, hope for good, allow for even better, 2012, ribbon, thread, pins, 51.5 × 47 in / 1.3 × 1.2 m

Christine Wong Yap, hope for good, allow for even better, 2012, ribbon, thread, pins, 51.5 × 47 in / 1.3 × 1.2 m

Standard
Sights

This Saturday in San Francisco

Positive Signs, 2011, glitter pen, fluorescent pen, foil print, gridded vellum, 8.5 × 11 in / 21.5 × 28 cm.

Positive Signs, 2011, glitter pen, fluorescent pen, foil print, gridded vellum, 8.5 × 11 in / 21.5 × 28 cm.

Artists’ Talk
In Other Words
Sat, March 24, 2pm
Intersection for the Arts
925 Mission Street (at Fifth), San Francisco CA 94103
Exhibition extended through 3/31
Gallery hours: Tue–Sat, 12–6pm

In Other Words is a group exhibition that looks at language and its capacity to clarify and confuse, convene and separate, inspire and discourage. By exploring a range of areas concering the influence and evolution of language in our lives—the impact of technology, the obscurity of industry-specific terminology, the psychological internalization of language, and the recontextualization of language—the artists in this exhibition demonstrate through a diversity of media the many ways in which we strive to communicate to each other.

Katie Gilmartin, Julia Goodman, Emanuela Harris-Sintamarian, Susan O’Malley, Meryl Pataky, Alex Potts, Cassie Thorton, Annie Vought, Christine Wong Yap

Read reviews on SFGate, Zero1 blog, and the East Bay Monthly.
View opening photos on ArtBusiness.com.

hope for good, allow for even better, 2012, ribbon, thread, pins, 51.5 × 47 in / 1.3 × 1.2 m

hope for good, allow for even better, 2012, ribbon, thread, pins, 51.5 × 47 in / 1.3 × 1.2 m

 

Opening reception: Sat, March 24, 3–5
Winter Art Walk 2012: Sat, March 24, 12–5
Voices of Home
Jenkins Johnson Gallery
464 Sutter Street (between Powell & Stockton), San Francisco, CA
Gallery hours: Tue–Fri 10–6; Sat 10–5
Exhibition: March 24–April 28, 2012

Each of these artists visually articulates works inspired by their diverse and rich cultural and ethnic backgrounds.

Artists: Noel Anderson, Kajahl Benes, Elaine Bradford, Elizabeth Colomba, Jamal Cyrus, Nathaniel Donnett, Zak Ové, Leslie Smith III, Devin Troy Strother, Felandus Thames, and Christine Wong Yap.

 

Standard
Research

Fun Facts

Last weekend, I enjoyed the rare honor of speaking publicly about my work twice in the same day.

First, I delivered a guest artist’s talk to a graduate seminar in San Francisco via Skype (a first for me). Emphasizing the vicissitudes of my life in the arts, I shared a factoid I learned from Creative Capital’s Professional Development workshop. I hope I remembered it correctly:

One positive response for every 13 to 15 applications for grants, residencies and awards is a pretty good average.

(Artists: It’s Spring deadline season. How are your applications coming along? Listings here.)

Being an artist can be variously trivial, serendipitous, laborious, or intentional. So I might have over-explained my art for these students, but it seems a worthy risk if it counter-balances, at least a bit, the obfuscation and unspoken rules about engaging the art world as an emerging artist.

While I wanted to convey the principle, nothing free—paying dues and investing sweat equity—I came away marveling at my good fortune to have benefitted from so many supportive organizations, foundations, and individuals… such as people who dream big, put in work, show up, share, and ask good questions—like the seminar students. The end of the Q&A came too soon.

Then, I participated in a group artists’ talk alongside other artists in Voices of Home at Jenkins Johnson Gallery. Independent curator Kalia Brooks did a great job moderating the panel, which included wave-splashing painting teachers and self-effacing younger artists. The artists have varied practices, terrain enough for an engaging discussion.

The audience, which exceeded the gallery’s seating capacity, was really great; thanks to everyone who attended.

The talk was organized in recognition of Black History Month, so with a panel of all (but one) Black artists, the subject of race and representation in the art field came up for discussion.

For emerging artists in San Francisco, New York City might still be seen as an art world center, with the center-of-the-center being Chelsea. For a panel of largely Black artists, speaking to a largely African American audience in a commercial gallery in Chelsea, geography was a non-issue, but access, via the lens of identity, was still a concern.

Some of the artists rejected the idea that they ought contend with identity in the studio, but no one disavowed as much when it came to engaging the professional field and the public realm.

Have you fantasized about de-activating your Facebook account? Me, too. Paul Martin’s definition of addiction—desire without pleasure—has characterized my recent experiences.

The headline,

“The Anti-Social Network: By helping other people look happy, Facebook is making us sad,”

of Libby Copeland’s article on Slate last year provides a clue to the problem.

Here is some irony about positive sentiments: I tried to keep my status updates positive, but willfully-upbeat presentations may actually be annoying, and en masse, distressing. I don’t think this undermines the value of optimism and positive enthusiasm in general, but speaks to Facebook’s perniciousness as a substitute for interaction and companionship.

So I’m taking a Facebook hiatus. It’s been four days, though it seems longer than that. Congratulations to me, I know. <Hallelujah hands.> [Sarcastic, I know. But I ought to share my un-Photoshopped sentiments, too, apparently. You have to start somewhere, buddies.]

One more fun fact, by way of Ritter Sport chocolates:

What Germans call “Halbbitter” (literally, “Half bitter”) is the same as what Americans call “semi-sweet.”

The half-full, half-empty optimism/pessimism riddle just got a chocolate-y analogue.

Standard
News

saturday feb 18: artists’ talk at jenkins johnson gallery

Give Thanks, 2011 site-specific installation of 39 pennant flags: satin ribbon, linen, gratitude statements, dimensions site-variable.

Give Thanks, 2011 site-specific installation of 39 pennant flags: satin ribbon, linen, gratitude statements, dimensions site-variable.

Flag Snowflake series, 2010, stick-on flags on neon paper, 8.5 x 11 inches / 21.5 x 30 cm

Flag Snowflake series, 2010, stick-on flags on neon paper, 8.5 x 11 inches / 21.5 x 30 cm

Saturday, February 18, 2012, 3:00 pm
Voices of Home 
panel discussion with participating artists

Moderated by Kalia Brooks, curator
521 West 26th Street 5th Floor, NY 10001
Gallery hours : Tuesday – Saturday, 10–6

Standard
News

Opening tomorrow, 6-8pm: Voices of Home

Give Thanks (installation detail at Untitled Gallery / Project Space Leeds), 2011, installation of 39 flags: satin ribbon, linen, gratitude statements; dimensions site-variable; each flag 12 x 18 in / 30 x 45 cm. Photo: Katie Rutherford/Untitled Gallery, Manchester, UK.

Give Thanks (installation detail at Untitled Gallery / Project Space Leeds), 2011, installation of 39 flags: satin ribbon, linen, gratitude statements; dimensions site-variable; each flag 12 x 18 in / 30 x 45 cm. Photo: Katie Rutherford/Untitled Gallery, Manchester, UK.

I’m very excited to exhibit two new text-and-ribbon installations, as well as a collection of Flag Snowflake collages. None of these projects have been shown in the US before.

January 12–February 25, 2012
Voices of Home

Jenkins Johnson Gallery
521 W. 26th Street, 5th Floor (near 10th Ave)
New York, NY 10001
Opening: Thursday, January 12, 6–8pm
Gallery hours: Tue–Sat, 10am–6pm

Standard
News

6/30–9/3: summer selections in san francisco and new york

hopexpectation, 2011, ribbon, thread, pins, 101 x 18 x 1 in / 257 x 48 x 2.5 cm.

hopexpectation (2011) will be on view at Jenkins Johnson Gallery, NYC.

I am happy to exhibit my latest ribbon texts in bicoastal group shows at Jenkins Johnson Gallery. In Chelsea, I’ll unveil hopexpectation and take charge of your happiness, while unlimited promise continues its residence in the project space. think good thoughts/fortify good attitudes will be exhibited in San Francisco, at the gallery’s location just around the corner from Union Square.

June 30–September 3, 2011
Summer Selections 
Jenkins Johnson Gallery
NYC: 521 W. 26th Street, 5th Floor (near 10th Ave); gallery hours: Tue–Sat, 10am–6pm
San Francisco: 464 Sutter Street (between Powell and Stockton); gallery hours: Tue–Fri, 10am–6pm, Sat 10am–5pm

Standard
Art & Development

Exhibition views of T_XT_RT @ Jenkins Johnson Gallery

Selected views of the current text-based show. Photos by Courtney Johnson.

Works by Nathaniel Donnett, Tim Etchells (Shouting your demands from the rooftop should be considered a last resort), and yours truly.

Works by Nathaniel Donnett, Tim Etchells (Shouting your demands from the rooftop should be considered a last resort), and yours truly.

Works by Samson Young, Burt Richie, Tim Etchells, Young, Jack Pierson, and Jeremy Burt.

Works by Samson Young, Burt Richie, Tim Etchells, Young, Jack Pierson, and Jeremy Burt.

In the project space: My installation, _Unlimited Promise_ (2009–2011, installation, foil-laminated paper, thread, light, shadow, dimensions variable).

In the project space: My installation, _Unlimited Promise_ (2009–2011, installation, foil-laminated paper, thread, light, shadow, dimensions variable).

There’s lots more work in the show. The exhibition continues through June 25, with readings on May 19 and June 2. Stop by.

Standard