Josiah McElheny, Interactions of the Abstract Body. Choreographed dancers activating mirrored triangular and circular artworks. With alumni from Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance: Lorea Burge, Mathilde Lepage Bagatta and Sandro Piccirilli. Co-ordinated with Susan Sentler. // Source: whitechapelgallery.org.

Josiah McElheny, Interactions of the Abstract Body. Choreographed dancers activating mirrored triangular and circular artworks. With alumni from Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance: Lorea Burge, Mathilde Lepage Bagatta and Sandro Piccirilli. Co-ordinated with Susan Sentler. // Source: whitechapelgallery.org.

Works

Josiah McElheny: Interactions of the Abstract Body

Image
Sights

get excited: cool things everywhere

Being an artist involves so many activities, I’ve fallen behind on seeing art. But there’s lots out there to be excited about!

 Amanda Curreri, Under the Socialist Sun with Interference, Monoprint with screenprint, 15 x 11 inches, 2013; Llewelynn Fletcher, Standing Sound Costume: Lion, 2010, basswood, mahogany, low frequency sound, bass-shaker speakers, 3.5'W X 3.5'L X 7'H. // Source: c3initiative.org.

Amanda Curreri, Under the Socialist Sun with Interference, Monoprint with screenprint, 15 x 11 inches, 2013; Llewelynn Fletcher, Standing Sound Costume: Lion, 2010, basswood, mahogany, low frequency sound, bass-shaker speakers, 3.5’W X 3.5’L X 7’H. // Source: c3initiative.org.

Cool artists getting a cool residency in Portland, OR

ERNEST Introductions (Amanda Curreri & Llewellyn Fletcher)
c3 initiative, Portland, OR
Dec 7, 2013 – Feb 15, 2014
Opening: Sat, Dec 7, 6-9pm
Launching ERNEST’s collaborative two-year public project and partnership with Portland’s c3 initiative.

Installation view of The Shadows Took Shape. // Source: StudioMuseum.org // Photo: Adam Reich

Installation view of The Shadows Took Shape. // Source: StudioMuseum.org // Photo: Adam Reich

Afrofuturist aesthetics @ the Studio Museum
Including a collaborative project by Nyeema Morgan
Plus a great portrait of the artists in the New Yorker Magazine

The Shadows Took Shape
November 14–March 9, 2014
Studio Museum
NYC

Artists of The Shadows Took Shape in the New Yorker Magazine. Photograph by Christaan Felber.

Artists of The Shadows Took Shape in the New Yorker Magazine. Photograph by Christaan Felber.

I don’t think female artists of color have enough visibility; this is a lovely move in a good direction.

Leonid Tishkov, Private Moon. // Source: ArtsCatalyst.org.

Leonid Tishkov, Private Moon. // Source: ArtsCatalyst.org.

A wonderfully speculative, lunar-themed exhibition in London

The preview images look so cool.

January 10-February 2, 2014
The Art Catalyst’s Republic of the Moon
Bargehouse, Oxo Tower Wharf, South Bank, London

Vacuum/plenum (the Cotard delusion, invisibility, and other gravities), 2009, mirror, two-way plexiglass mirror, aluminum, steel, casters, Dimensions variable, mirrored box is 4x4x7 ft. // Source: SeldonYuan.com

Vacuum/plenum (the Cotard delusion, invisibility, and other gravities), 2009, mirror, two-way plexiglass mirror, aluminum, steel, casters, Dimensions variable, mirrored box is 4x4x7 ft. // Source: SeldonYuan.com

Vacuum/plenum (the Cotard delusion, invisibility, and other gravities), by Seldon Yuan

I came across this NYC artist when I received a rejection letter and he was listed as one of the winners. But when I viewed his site, and this project in particular, the selection committee’s wisdom became apparent to me. The sting of rejection is a mitigated by intrigue of this work. I wish this project was my own. It’s brilliant.

Personal Goal Setting Advice for Artists

Love this Personal Goal Setting advice from  Creative Capital’s Internet for Artists Handbook. I came across this a while ago but keep recommending it to folks. Really useful!

(I just noticed it’s written by Blithe Riley, an artist involved in interesting, radical visual art programming at Interference Archive in Gowanus in Brooklyn. Coming up this week: neat programming around Asian American struggle.)

Your turn: These Calls for Entry

Signal Fire’s spring exhibition in the New Mexico wilderness
Spring applications due December 31

Interface Gallery’s call for participatory projects
Oakland, CA
Stipends available. Applications due January 1, 2014.

 

Standard
Impressions

Chelsea jaunt

Made lemons out of lemonade today: Sidelined from running, I took up biking, and I rode down to Chelsea and up to Columbia for some art shows. Perfect weather for it.

Standouts:

Three of the four shows I loved have to do with mirrors. So sue me.

Michelangelo Pistoletto, Lavoro - Atelier, 2008-2011, Silkscreen on polished super mirror stainless steel 59 X 59 inches (150 X 150 cm). // Source: luhringaugustine.com

Michelangelo Pistoletto, Lavoro - Atelier, 2008-2011, Silkscreen on polished super mirror stainless steel 59 X 59 inches (150 X 150 cm). // Source: luhringaugustine.com

Michelangelo Pistoletto at Luhring Augustine
Lavoro
Thru April 28

The Arte Povera mirror-maker depicts construction workers, bringing the past of each building these are shown in into the present. I liked these a lot. Baffled why the statement said that the images are “adhered” when the image captions, and the works themselves, suggest screenprinting as the medium. These are not my favorite Pistolettos; I liked some of the older ones at the Walker and Brooklyn Museum better, but it’s still great to see so many of them in one place. A treat.

Greg Smith at Susan Inglett Gallery
ners Banners Banners Ban
Thru May 26

GO SEE IT. ESPECIALLY THE VIDEO.

If you can’t make it, read on…. (Spoiler alert.)

I made a point of going into galleries that aren’t on my usual route, and this one paid off. There are drawings and mixed media assemblages with a harness, all very cruddy and rough. The best thing, though, is a video that documents a performance in which the artist produced and installed the works under and on the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway. There’s a belt of canvas that goes completely around the car, and shots of the artist operating a sewing machine while driving (not recommended!). He used copious amounts of sweetly colorful dots, and also made some fabric-and-cotton-batting pennant flags. It’s a bizarre experiment with lots of physical and legal risk for crafty, yet un-crafted, artworks. Super thought-provoking for thinking about what is at stake in a work or practice, and what is success or failure.

Grey Peak of the Wave, Installation view, 2012 Alicja Kwade, Alexandra Leykauf and Florian & Michael Quistrebert. Source: HarrisLieberman.com.

Grey Peak of the Wave, Installation view, 2012 Alicja Kwade, Alexandra Leykauf and Florian & Michael Quistrebert. Source: HarrisLieberman.com.

Grey Peak of the Wave at Harris Leiberman
Group show of European artistst
Through April 28

I love this kind of work. Subtle, open-ended, perceptual, quiet. My favorites were:

Alicja Kwade’s taped glass sheets with two lamps, one on, one off (above, on ground). In the glass’ reflection, the unlit lamp appears convincingly illuminated.

Alicja Kwade’s bent mirrors, as if drooping down off the wall like a sheet of paper (also seen above, in the rear space). Surreal. Materially simple, disguising what I’m sure was laborious or expensive fabrication. Manipulating common materials in uncommon ways never gets old to me.

Alexandra Leykauf’s wall vinyls and framed photos (also above, back wall). Who doesn’t love a b/w photo of geometric abstraction made with real objects? And then complicating commodification with both framed works and site-specific, one-use vinyl? So simple, so good.

IRAN do ESPÍRITO SANTO, Installation view of SWITCH at Sean Kelly Gallery, New York March 21 - April 28, 2012 Photo: Jason Wyche, New York. Source: skny.com.

IRAN do ESPÍRITO SANTO, Installation view of SWITCH at Sean Kelly Gallery, New York March 21 - April 28, 2012 Photo: Jason Wyche, New York. Source: skny.com.

Iran do Espírito Santo at Sean Kelly
Switch
Thru April 28

I loved this Brazilian artists’ subtle, perceptual, materially sophisticated works ever since I saw a few at Altman Siegal in San Francisco. This show is a brave selection of 3 major works: a large wall painting, a series of marble replicas of glass bulb covers, and this series of “mirrors.” In fact, these are all made with two sheets of plate glass sandwiching a reflective tint. They look like mirrors until you spend a little more time with them, and realize that they are slightly transparent. They don’t, as the press release states, look like they’re folding, the way Kwade’s bent mirrors do at Harris Lieberman. But they do achieve something else, which as to do with how the leaning piece and the floor piece allow slightly different amounts of light and reflectivity. It’s sort of like the difference between a 100% printed CMYK black, and a “rick black,” which is a mixture using more colors, and hence, more saturation. The mirror on the floor looks as if you could fall into it.

Standard
Research

Jim Hodges

Jim Hodges (b. 1957) is an American contemporary artist based in New York, NY. I loved his work at Barbara Gladstone (both locations) a few months ago, as well as at SFMOMA and Marc Foxx Galleryin LA in the past. His materials (including mirrors and lightbulbs), and themes (happiness) overlap with those in my work. I am finally getting around to doing more research about him.

The more I learn, the more it seems that I’ve been following in Hodge’s footsteps.

What I admire most about Hodges’ work is this: simple gestures generating expansive imports. In other words, 1 + 1 = 3. When two recognizable things or ideas combine for an unexpected outcome, it’s startling.

Hodge’s work can be luminous or colorful, and suggestive of pleasure or happiness, but it is also characterized by themes of death and fragility. The feeling of loss made sense when I learned that Hodges was a contemporary and friend of Felix Gonzales-Torres. I was also reminded of how Tom Friedman experiments with common materials too.

Below are some photos found online, and some scanned in from an exhibition catalog. I think the dates of the works are quite telling about the artist’s development.

Past Installations

I suspect that Hodge’s fake flower projects started with simple material investigations: taking apart ready-made flowers, arranging and re-arranging them, which culminates in monumentally-scaled curtains that drape on the floor.

Jim Hodges, Untitled (Threshold), 1993–4, silk, plastic, thread, steel wire, 92x58 inches. The Ann and Mel Schaffer Family Collection. Source: Hodges, Jim, Ian Berry, Ron Platt, and Allan Schwartzman. 2003. Jim Hodges. Saratoga Springs, N.Y.: Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College.

Jim Hodges, Untitled (Threshold), 1993–4, silk, plastic, thread, steel wire, 92x58 inches. The Ann and Mel Schaffer Family Collection. Source: Hodges, Jim, Ian Berry, Ron Platt, and Allan Schwartzman. 2003. Jim Hodges. Saratoga Springs, N.Y.: Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College.

Jim Hodges, Changing things (detail), 1997, Silk, plastic, wire and pins (342 parts), 193 x 376 cm, Dallas Museum of Art, Mary Margaret Munson Wilcox Fund and gift of Catherine and Will Rose, Howard Rachofsky, Christopher Drew and Alexandra May, and Martin Posner and Robyn Menter-Posner, © martabuso / Fondazione Bevilacqua La Masa, From the exhibition Love, eccetera, Fondazione Bevilacqua La Masa, 5 February-5 April 2010, Piazza San Marco Gallery, Venezia. Source: ArtTattler.com.

Jim Hodges, Changing things (detail), 1997, Silk, plastic, wire and pins (342 parts), 193 x 376 cm, Dallas Museum of Art, Mary Margaret Munson Wilcox Fund and gift of Catherine and Will Rose, Howard Rachofsky, Christopher Drew and Alexandra May, and Martin Posner and Robyn Menter-Posner, © martabuso / Fondazione Bevilacqua La Masa, From the exhibition Love, eccetera, Fondazione Bevilacqua La Masa, 5 February-5 April 2010, Piazza San Marco Gallery, Venezia. Source: ArtTattler.com.

A massive curtain composed completely of fake flowers. It’s super colorful and translucent in person. It’s also very difficult to resist touching. Sometimes I think contemporary art is afraid of sentiment, but this work wholly embraces joy. Very pop.

Jim Hodges, No Betweens, 1996; sculpture; silk, cotton, polyester, and thread, 360 in. x 324 in. (914.4 cm x 822.96 cm); Collection SFMOMA, Purchase through a gift of Kimberly S. Light; © Jim Hodges  Source: San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

Jim Hodges, No Betweens, 1996; sculpture; silk, cotton, polyester, and thread, 360 in. x 324 in. (914.4 cm x 822.96 cm); Collection SFMOMA, Purchase through a gift of Kimberly S. Light; © Jim Hodges Source: San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

Jim Hodges, Where are we now? (detail), 1999, silk, cotton, polyester, and thread, 24x18 feet, installation view at Miami Art Museum, Carlos and Rosa de la Cruz Collection. Source: Hodges, Jim, Ian Berry, Ron Platt, and Allan Schwartzman. 2003. Jim Hodges. Saratoga Springs, N.Y.: Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College.

Jim Hodges, Where are we now? (detail), 1999, silk, cotton, polyester, and thread, 24x18 feet, installation view at Miami Art Museum, Carlos and Rosa de la Cruz Collection. Source: Hodges, Jim, Ian Berry, Ron Platt, and Allan Schwartzman. 2003. Jim Hodges. Saratoga Springs, N.Y.: Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College.

Here’s a curious black version.

Jim Hodges, The end from where you are, 1998, Silk, cotton, polyester, and thread, 16 x 16'. Source: ArtTattler.com.

Jim Hodges, The end from where you are, 1998, Silk, cotton, polyester, and thread, 16 x 16'. Source: ArtTattler.com.

Jim Hodges, Into Life, 2001  Silk, cotton, polyester and thread; dimensions variable. Source: GladstoneGallery.com.

Jim Hodges, Into Life, 2001 Silk, cotton, polyester and thread; dimensions variable. Source: GladstoneGallery.com.

 

I’ve been sewing and thinking about flags a lot, so here’s one more instance of serendipity.

Jim Hodges, Here's Where We Will Stay  printed nylon, painted chiffon and silk head scarves with thread, embroidery and sequins 230 x 225 in. (584.2 x 571.5 cm.) 1995. Source: Christies.com.

Jim Hodges, Here's Where We Will Stay printed nylon, painted chiffon and silk head scarves with thread, embroidery and sequins 230 x 225 in. (584.2 x 571.5 cm.) 1995. Source: Christies.com.

Immersive gold leaf.

Jim Hodges and still this 2005-2008 23.5K and 24K gold with Beva on gessoed linen in 10 parts 200" x 185" x 89". Source: JamesWagner.com.

Jim Hodges and still this 2005-2008 23.5K and 24K gold with Beva on gessoed linen in 10 parts 200" x 185" x 89". Source: JamesWagner.com.

2.5-D
(Works that are not quite 2-D or 3-D)

Jim Hodges, Folding (into a Greater World), 1998 Mirror on canvas in two parts 72 x 96 inches Collection of Eileen and Peter Norton, Santa Monica. Source: ArtLies.org.

Jim Hodges, Folding (into a Greater World), 1998 Mirror on canvas in two parts 72 x 96 inches Collection of Eileen and Peter Norton, Santa Monica. Source: ArtLies.org.

Jim Hodges, Movements (stage II), 2006  Mirror on canvas; 84 x 96 inches. Source: GladstoneGallery.com.

Jim Hodges, Movements (stage II), 2006 Mirror on canvas; 84 x 96 inches. Source: GladstoneGallery.com.

Having spent so much time obsessed with light bulbs for previous projects, it’s strange that I’m only just now coming across this work.

Jim Hodges, Coming Through, 1999 Light bulbs, ceramic sockets, wood and metal panels 31 x 63 x 5 inches Collection of Rebecca and Alexander Stewart, Seattle. Source: ArtLies.org.

Jim Hodges, Coming Through, 1999 Light bulbs, ceramic sockets, wood and metal panels 31 x 63 x 5 inches Collection of Rebecca and Alexander Stewart, Seattle. Source: ArtLies.org.

Jim Hodges, With the Wind, 1997, scarves, thread, 90x99x5 inches. Collection of Penny Cooper and Rena Rosenwasser. Source: Hodges, Jim, Ian Berry, Ron Platt, and Allan Schwartzman. 2003. Jim Hodges. Saratoga Springs, N.Y.: Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College.

Jim Hodges, With the Wind, 1997, scarves, thread, 90x99x5 inches. Collection of Penny Cooper and Rena Rosenwasser. Source: Hodges, Jim, Ian Berry, Ron Platt, and Allan Schwartzman. 2003. Jim Hodges. Saratoga Springs, N.Y.: Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College.

I love how simple yet effective this is. It’s presented in an unfussy way, yet is beautiful and works beautifully.

Jim Hodges, Arranged, 1996, Folded book with metal paper clips, 33 x 16.5 x 26 cm, photo: Heidi L. Steiger. Source: ArtTattler.com.

Jim Hodges, Arranged, 1996, Folded book with metal paper clips, 33 x 16.5 x 26 cm, photo: Heidi L. Steiger. Source: ArtTattler.com.

Jim Hodges, Untitled, 2001, Prismacolor on wall, dims. var. Installation views, CRG Gallery, NY. Source: Hodges, Jim, Ian Berry, Ron Platt, and Allan Schwartzman. 2003. Jim Hodges. Saratoga Springs, N.Y.: Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College.

Jim Hodges, Untitled, 2001, Prismacolor on wall, dims. var. Installation views, CRG Gallery, NY. Source: Hodges, Jim, Ian Berry, Ron Platt, and Allan Schwartzman. 2003. Jim Hodges. Saratoga Springs, N.Y.: Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College.

Works on Paper

Jim Hodges, Overlaps under there, 1999, tissue paper with cut paper, 30 x 22.5 inches. Private Collection, NY. Source: Hodges, Jim, Ian Berry, Ron Platt, and Allan Schwartzman. 2003. Jim Hodges. Saratoga Springs, N.Y.: Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College.

Jim Hodges, Overlaps under there, 1999, tissue paper with cut paper, 30 x 22.5 inches. Private Collection, NY. Source: Hodges, Jim, Ian Berry, Ron Platt, and Allan Schwartzman. 2003. Jim Hodges. Saratoga Springs, N.Y.: Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College.

Happy III Jim Hodges (American, born 1957)  2001. Colored pencil on two pieces of paper, Installation: 60 x 44 1/2" (152.4 x 113 cm). The Judith Rothschild Foundation Contemporary Drawings Collection Gift. © 2012 Jim Hodges. Source: MoMA.org.

Happy III Jim Hodges (American, born 1957) 2001. Colored pencil on two pieces of paper, Installation: 60 x 44 1/2" (152.4 x 113 cm). The Judith Rothschild Foundation Contemporary Drawings Collection Gift. © 2012 Jim Hodges. Source: MoMA.org.

Jim Hodges  COMPLEX CHORD - GREEN CENTERED GOLD 2011 collage 15 1/8 x 11 1/2 x 2 1/2 inches. Source: 2by2catalogue.org.

Jim Hodges COMPLEX CHORD - GREEN CENTERED GOLD 2011 collage 15 1/8 x 11 1/2 x 2 1/2 inches. Source: 2by2catalogue.org.

Jim Hodges. Source: art-documents.tumblr.com

Jim Hodges. Source: art-documents.tumblr.com

Found this today. Oddly, I’ve also been playing with photo transparencies of kitch imagery in the studio lately.

Jim Hodges, I've pictured us..., 2008, Folded archival pigment print on transparent Mylar, 36 7/8 x 27 x 2 3/4 inches. Source: ArtNet.com.

Jim Hodges, I've pictured us..., 2008, Folded archival pigment print on transparent Mylar, 36 7/8 x 27 x 2 3/4 inches. Source: ArtNet.com.

Text Work

Lift ticket for Aspen Art Museum’s partnership project. If this is not positive psychology, I don’t know what is.

Jim Hodges, Give More Than You Take, 2008. Image courtesy of the artist and CRG Gallery, New York. Source: aspenartmuseum.org.

Jim Hodges, Give More Than You Take, 2008. Image courtesy of the artist and CRG Gallery, New York. Source: aspenartmuseum.org.

For this billboard, according to the Hirshhorn:

Hodges invited international delegates to the United Nations to translate in their own language and handwriting the phrase “don’t be afraid.”

Originally used “to remind the artist to have courage in making his own work,” the phrase also takes on various political connotations.

Jim Hodges, Don’t Be Afraid billboard at the Hirschhorn, 2005-2006. Source: hirshhorn.si.edu.

Jim Hodges, Don’t Be Afraid billboard at the Hirshhorn, 2005-2006. Source: hirshhorn.si.edu.

Jim Hodges, Don't Be Afraid, 2004  Injet on vinyl; dimensions variable. Source: GladstoneGallery.com

Jim Hodges, Don't Be Afraid, 2004 Injet on vinyl; dimensions variable. Source: GladstoneGallery.com

Recent Exhibitions

Selections from the knock-out exhibitions at Barbara Gladstone this past winter. Rejoice, Minnesotans: these are going to be in the Walker’s 2014 survey exhibition, Jim Hodges: sometimes beauty.

Jim Hodges Untitled (2011) installed at Barbara Gladstone Gallery, New York Photo: Gladstone Gallery. Source: WalkerArt.org.

Jim Hodges, Untitled (2011) installed at Barbara Gladstone Gallery, New York Photo: Gladstone Gallery. Source: WalkerArt.org.

Get the backstory on the monoliths at Walker Art Magazine.

Jim Hodges oversees the deinstallation of Untitled at Gladstone Gallery. Source: WalkerArt.org.

Jim Hodges oversees the deinstallation of Untitled at Gladstone Gallery. Source: WalkerArt.org.

Installation using light, mirrors, motors, blackened water, the entire gallery space, and then some. It’s really riveting. Have a look at the video of a performance at jimhodges.com.

Jim Hodges, Untitled, 2011  Mirror ball, mechanics and water; dimensions variable. Source: BarbaraGladstone.com.

Jim Hodges, Untitled, 2011 Mirror ball, mechanics and water; dimensions variable. Source: GladstoneGallery.com.

Jim Hodges, Untitled, 2011  Mirror ball, mechanics and water; dimensions variable. Source: BarbaraGladstone.com.

Jim Hodges, Untitled, 2011 Mirror ball, mechanics and water; dimensions variable. Source: GladstoneGallery.com.

Untitled, 2011  Wood, canvas, tempera and mechanics; Inside: 120 x 180 x 180 inches (304.8 x 457.2 x 457.2 cm) / Outside: 163 x 185 1/4 x 189 1/4 inches (414 x 470.5 x 480.7 cm). Source: BarbaraGladstone.com.

Jim Hodges, Untitled, 2011 Wood, canvas, tempera and mechanics; Inside: 120 x 180 x 180 inches (304.8 x 457.2 x 457.2 cm) / Outside: 163 x 185 1/4 x 189 1/4 inches (414 x 470.5 x 480.7 cm). Source: GladstoneGallery.com.

It’s interesting to think about how an artist develops—starting with modest projects made alone, in a studio, using materials at hand, and then orchestrating multi-venue, logistics-laden, monumental fabrication projects. This is a particularly contemporary way for an artist’s work to mature, as the latter is only possible with market success and the support of blue-chip institutions.

Perhaps if emerging artists bushwhack their way through creative territories, established artists have to remain true to course despite siren songs of numerous pathways (sorry for mixing maritime and terrestrial metaphors). Even in his recent massive metallized boulders, I think Hodges’ work retains its elemental, experimental and experiential aspects.

This seems to be true for viewers and for artists, including Hodges. Quoted by Heidi Zuckerman Jacobson of the Aspen Art Museum (HuffPo), Hodges said:

There are no guarantees [in art]. [Art] challenges and rewards. We get what we choose from it.

Surveying an artist’s life’s work is a great way to gain perspective. When I did a lot of research on contemporary artists in graduate school, I realized that of the artists whose work I love, the work they’re making their fifties is outstanding. Hodges is in his mid-fifties. (So is Cindy Sherman.) The message is to keep pushing, be patient, and never stop evolving.

I think it’s fantastic that the Walker is going to host a survey of Hodges’ work next year. Combined with the Walker’s amazing design team, I’m sure the catalog is going to be fantastic. Maybe a Phaidon monograph will be in order soon?

Standard
Research

Miracle Polish by Steven Milhauser

What I saw was a man who had something to look forward to, a man who expected things of life.

See why Millhauser’s my new favorite fablist—read the short story, “Miracle Polish,” by Steven Millhauser on NewYorker.com.

Why?

Mirrors.
Optimism.
Happiness, and the difference between desire and satisfaction.
The cave; seeing things as they are or how you want them to be.

mirrorsblackportrait, 2011, mirrors, paint, frames, wire, motor, hardware; 112 x 21 x 21 in / 2.8 m x 0.5 x 0.5 m (site variable)
mirrorsblackportrait, 2011, mirrors, paint, frames, wire, motor, hardware; 112 x 21 x 21 in / 2.8 m x 0.5 x 0.5 m (site variable)
Standard
Community

A sequence of images of inventions and rubbish that strike my fancy and stoke my curiousity.

IAN BURNS, Glacier, 2008, Found object kinetic sculpture producing live video and audio Assembled size: 59” x 24” x 21” Edition of 5. Source: Nettie Horn

Ian Burn’s Glacier is the press image for Sensescapes at Nettie Horn (London) 2/27-3/28, a group exhibition that purports:

Despite the age and universality of this subject, our environment or “landscape” is still a source of investigation since our conscience plays a role in shaping our processes of representation of these environments. In order to develop this reflexion about how we experience “the world” around us, the exhibition will deal with the notion of “sensescapes” – a sensory experience evoking the relation between space and senses, geography and mind.

Installation view of Theory of a family by Ginger Wolfe-Suarez. Source: Silverman Gallery

Still yet to span the gap between Oakland and the Tendernob, but Ginger Wolfe-Suarez‘ exhibition, Theory of a family, at Silverman Gallery in San Francisco 2/5-3/13 looks utterly fascinating. Sign me up.

Installation view of Graham Dolphin's work at Spasticus Artisticus. Source: Ceri Hand Gallery

Graham Dolphin’s work (pictured) is just some of the slightly ludicrous, Mike Kelly-ish artistic production on view in Spasticus Artisticus,
Curated by Jota Castro & Christian Viveros-Faune at Ceri Hand Gallery
(Liverpool) 1/12-1/27. Can’t make it out to Liverpool? See large images of the exhibition online. Photos can’t replace first-hand experience with art objects and videos, but if the other option is missing the exhibition entirely, I’ll take the photos.

Jeppe Hein, Mobile Mobile, 2010, Exercise bike, steel construction, chain drive, mirrors, Variable dimensions. Source: NicolaiWallner.com

Jeppe Hein’s Millieu Social at Galleri Nicolai Wallner (Copenhagen) 1/29-3/20

A live situation by Pierre Huyghe. Photo: Ola Rindal. Source: E-Flux.com

This mysterious and lovely photo promoting A live situation, an ongoing project by Pierre Huyghe, consisting of a series of situations performed on 10/31/09, 2/14/10, and 5/1/10.

Standard
Community

Erlich, Chen

Hair Salon is a mirrored installation by Leandro Erlich at the Singapore Biennial — but it uses no mirrors. Brilliant! The work’s investigation of the “mutability of perception” strikes a chord with me (see my work in Activist Imagination). It’s funny how much this piece reminds me of Mario Ybarra Jr.’s New Chinatown Barbershop installation, yet with totally different aims.

See pics and read more in a write-up by Fumio Nanjo for Universes in Universe.

Also, an unsung hero gets some recognition… Edward Guthmann wrote up a nice profile of one of the most respected, intelligent, hardworking artists and exhibition-producers I have the good fortune of knowing and working with. Check it out at “Kevin Chen’s job: to make sure show goes on,” S.F. Chronicle (October 2, 2008)

Standard