Community, News

7/14: Opening @ Kala Art Institute, Berkeley

After five weeks of intensive printmaking and sewing, I’m happily exhausted and happy to share Ways and Means, a new body of letterpress-printed activity kits, collaborative games, and custom garments exploring interdependence and resourcefulness. The project includes collaborations with Leah RosenbergElizabeth Travelslight, and Sarrita Hunn (Institute for Autonomous Practices). Ways and Means is participatory—come, interact, bring a buddy, and make new buddies.

Details from Ways and Means: letterpress printed cut-and-assemble activity on interdependence (two-color linoleum and polymer printed and bound at the Center for Book Arts) and apron (two-color screenprint on canvas, sewn with Sophia Wong).

Details from Ways and Means: letterpress printed cut-and-assemble activity on interdependence (two-color linoleum and polymer printed and bound at the Center for Book Arts, NYC) and apron (two-color screenprint on canvas, sewn with Sophia Wong).

July 14 – October 15, 2016
Appro-propagation
Residency Projects: New Work by 2015-2016 Kala Fellows

Opening Reception: Thursday, July 14, 6-8pm

Kala Art Institute
Gallery: 2990 San Pablo Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94702
Gallery Hours: Tue-Fri, 12-5:00pm; Sat, 12-4:30pm

Takuji Hamanaka
Jamil Hellu
Lucy Puls
Ronny Quevedo
Neil Rivas
Leah Rosenberg
James Voller
Christine Wong Yap


This experience has been so positive in bountiful ways. I’ll elaborate more later, but at this moment I am moved to share my gratitude for the organizations and so many individuals who have made this possible: Kala Art Institute; the Kala Fellows Program; Kala staff (particularly Carrie Hott, Paper Buck, Ben EngleAndrea Voinot, and Mayumi Hamanaka for their help and trust, and Archana Horsting and Yuzo Nakano for having the vision to create and maintain such a special place); Kala fellow Fellows, Honorary Fellows, AIRs, and interns for contributing to the spirit of welcoming community and knowledge-and-resource-sharing; the Center for Book Arts’ AIR Workspace Grant program; Val Imus and Southern Exposure for non-profits’ mutual aid; Kevin B. Chen and Genevieve Quick for believing in me; collaborators Sarrita Hunn, Leah Rosenberg, Elizabeth Travelslight; installer Gary and interns Katrina and Sean; Sophia Wong for sewing assistance; and Michael Yap for unending support. I am also grateful for Susan O’Malley, to have shared in her life, work, and wisdom, and—I believe—a feeling that interdependent entanglements such as these swell our hearts and lives… Thank you.

Standard
Sights

XYZ: perceptions and spaces

December 7-22, 2011
XYZ:NYC 10 Downing
Leslie Eastman and Natasha Johns-Messenger
presented by No Longer Empty
10 Downing Street, West Village, NYC

A collaborative team since 2004, their work has historically focused on exploring real and perceived space through interventions in interior architecture. For XYZ: NYC 10 Downing, the pair will seek to challenge the perception of visitors through a three-part series of optical site installations designed to force visitors to experience and interpret alternate points of view.

This is a pretty great exhibition, complete with a camera obscura, perceptual mirrors-and-lights spaces, virtual reality goggles, and a Naumann-esque hallway. I heard about the exhibition via a program, wherein an NYU psychologist, the former NY Times Ethicist Randy Cohen, and the two artists shared lots of thoughts about optical and psychological perception, the ethical responsibilities of artists, and biases. It was a great talk. Eastman, in particular, had some prime nuggets:

[The exhibition] doesn’t have footnotes, but it does have references.

and

[On expanding perception through drawing:] It’s like learning to hear the bass and not just the treble.

Looking forward to more programs from No Longer Empty.

Standard
Art & Development, Community, Research

Works in Progress

Christine Wong Yap Work-in-progress view of Cloud II (Aura / Good Thoughts) 2011 mixed media installation: Glitter foil on board, 3-D illusion plastic, fun fur yarn, thread, elastic, hula hoops, beads dimensions vary

Christine Wong Yap, Work-in-progress view of Cloud II (Aura / Good Thoughts), 2011, mixed media installation.

I’ve been working on a new cutout text installation for a forthcoming group exhibition. It will be an optimistic, exhuberant update to my copper and elastic installation, Cloud.

Cloud (installation view), 2006, copper, rope, elastic, monofilament, 7 x 6 feet / 2.1 x 1.8 m

Cloud (installation view), 2006, copper, rope, elastic, monofilament, 7 x 6 feet / 2.1 x 1.8 m

The original installation was comprised of mundane, mindless texts, such as “hey, it’s me, are you busy now?” The new iteration uses spoken, written and emailed texts from my life that express happiness, gratitude, or empathy. It will be made of colorful materials like 3D illusion plastic and glitter foil.

Your wish has come true

Work-in-progress view of hand-cut glitter foil on board. Text: “Your wish has come true.”

February 28 – April 1, 2011
Portraiture: Inside Out
Opening Reception: Thursday, March 3, 5—9pm
An exhibition of contemporary portraiture. Curated by Ruth Ballester, Whitney Fehl and Lauren Thompson, Graduate Students in the Museum Professions Program.

Artists: Sarah Bliss, Dominic Guarnaschelli, Gwen Hardie, Jenny Hyde, Pat Lay, Greg Leshé, So Yoon Lym, Ryan Roa, Steve Rossi, Jesse Eric Schmidt, Travis LeRoy Southworth, Tanja Targersen, Peter Whittenberger, Christine Wong Yap, Raphael Zollinger

Opening Reception: Thursday, March 3, 5–9pm
Walsh Gallery at Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ
Gallery hours: Monday–Friday, 10:30am–4:30pm

Also in the exhibition, by chance, are two members of the collective, Brolab, who I met through volunteering for the Art in Odd Places festival, and whose work I enthused about, last fall.

Random & Rad:

I did a Google image search for “attitude” and this is what came up:

Google image search results for Attitude

I love the mix of results! Trashy, jokey mottos alongside sincere (if simplistic) mantras for optimism. Just the first row is brilliant: unapologetic crudeness underscored by a sassy type treatment, self-help clichés (positive thinking, magic, happy face), motivational sports maxims, more unapologetic crudeness plus sexual egomania, and a party-goer’s mantra. It sort of exemplifies American ignominy as well as the desire for inspiration and the futility of oversimplified positive thinking. It presents lowbrow poles of irony and sincerity.

Standard