I love the starkness of Silvio Lorusso’s take on Alfred Barr’s diagram of modern art, minus the text and color.

Silvio Lorusso, Blank Diagrams #2: Alfred H. Barr – Cubism and Abstract Art (1936). // Source: silviolorusso.com

Silvio Lorusso, Blank Diagrams #2: Alfred H. Barr – Cubism and Abstract Art (1936). // Source: silviolorusso.com

 

Research, Works

Barr Chart Sans Text

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The Eve Of...

The Eve Of… NYC Residency pilot program

Surprisingly, I’ve achieved a residency’s studio focus and solitude… even in NYC. 

I was nervous that staying at home in NYC would allow too many distractions for this to be as productive as an overnight residency. But many things have helped to shift my experience, and are pretty effective in combination.

Staying really local. I’ve been keeping it Queens—I’ve only left the borough twice in the past three weeks: home, studio, repeat.

Yet changing it up. The studio is in a part of LIC I’d never been to before. It’s been neat to eat lunch and people-watch in the public courtyard, and patronize different mom and pop stores. I’ve also been riding my bike instead of taking the subway; it makes me feel like I set the rhythm of my day.

It’s August. It helps that NYC’s emptied out; even my emails have quieted down.

Cleared calendar. My obligations have been postponed and my priorities are crystal clear. It’s great not having to deliberate about squeezing in anything else.

Creature comforts. Unlike at away-residencies, there’s no learning curve in the logistics of everyday life—sleeping, grooming, nourishment, etc. I sleep in my own bed, cook in my own kitchen, and don’t have to miss my husband.

Disconnecting: deactivating my FB account. It became a pleasureless addiction. I had some withdrawal the first two weeks, but it holds little appeal now. It’s shocking how habitual it became: how easily I’ll mindlessly point my browser there, mentally compose status updates that are ultimately trivial, or desire a crowd-sourced solution instead of trusting my own opinions and decisions. These days, I’m so busy and then so tired, there’s little room for anything else, and I can’t imagine how much time I squandered onscreen. I will probably return—but keep my usage restricted.

Enduring my own mind. I’ve spent at least eight hours of every day alone in the studio. I was rusty at the beginning, when my overactive, lazy-way-out squirrel-brain pulled me in too many directions. But now I’m a bit more adept, staying on task and pushing through when I’m tired.

I can tolerate a lot of solitude but it’s also making me feel a bit starved for socialization. I take this as a good sign, as I remember this feeling from other residencies I’ve done. I’m starting to have enough work to show others, so I’m looking forward to scheduling studio visits soon.

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Meta-Practice

“…these hack crowdsourcing campaigns that certain agencies are selling to [companies]. There are lots of folks doing very cool things with user-generated content, but to ask professionals to compete against each other for potential ‘exposure’ is completely different. It’s demeaning…”

—Dan Casaro, as quoted by David Griner, “Meet the Hero Designer Who Publicly Shamed Showtime for Asking Him to Work for Free,” Adweek, August 19, 2014

Showtime holding a spec design contest to promote a Mayweather fight!? Please. What nerve! They’re raking it in hand over fist by overcharging fight fans for over-hyped, disappointing pay-per-view events. I’d love to see a contest where they’re obliged to use the most voted-upon entry, and only terrible art is submitted. Cheers to Dan Casaro, speaking up for designers everywhere.

(Via CLF)

Telling mega-media corporations: NO SPEC!

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The Eve Of...

The Eve Of…: Studio-based Exhibitions

The studio as a gallery of one’s own.

The Eve Of… will be an open studio exhibition. What does that mean? A studio turned gallery? A pop-up gallery in a pop-up studio? Is it DIY or DIM (do it myself)? The exhibition is “artist-run,” in perhaps the most literal sense.

In any case, I think of self-organization as a method of actualizing my agency as an artist. I’m enamored with the idea that artists can stage exhibitions on our own terms.

In my small way, I’m proud to carry on a tradition of artists not waiting to be picked in order to share work with the public. Some examples:

Claes Oldenberg, The Store (1961, Lower Manhattan): a self-initiated installation in a studio open to the public // Source: museumofmuseum.com

Claes Oldenberg, The Store (1961, Lower Manhattan): a self-initiated installation in a studio open to the public // Source: museumofmuseum.com

Michelangelo Pistoletto, Minus Objects (1965-66, Turin): studio-based public exhibition (including some of my favorite artworks by MP) // Source: pistoletto.it // Photo: P. Bressano.

Michelangelo Pistoletto, Minus Objects (1965-66, Turin): studio-based public exhibition (including some of my favorite artworks by MP) // Source: pistoletto.it // Photo: P. Bressano.

I’d love to learn more, if you know of others.

To reiterate: what artists make—artworks—gets amplified through what artists make happen— exhibitions, events, dialogues.

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The Eve Of..., Uncategorized

The Eve Of… Mid-August Residency Update

Self-initiating a residency is a risky proposition.

It’s taken me longer than I planned, but today I finally started moving into a larger studio for The Eve Of…. I brought over tools and a haul of lumber, and built five frames for light boxes. It was gratifying to anoint a long-awaited space with fresh sawdust.

Stack of frames and chop saw

I’m relieved to end my search. As I previously alluded, this project’s process entails a lot of uncertainty, and the biggest challenge has been finding a space. There just hasn’t been many art studio vacancies (thanks to Queens’ rising popularity). Further, few vacancies met the needs of this project—sublets were versatile enough, and larger spaces required longer terms.

Luckily, Paul Kelterborn and the Falchi Building want to support local arts, and have provided a temporary pop-up space at below-market rate for this project. I am so thankful to them for helping to make The Eve Of… possible.

If you associate my work with positive emotions exclusively, you might be surprised to learn that The Eve Of… delves into emotional states that aren’t upbeat. This change in direction is new, scary, and interesting for me.

I am intrigued to see that psychologist Todd Kashdan’s forthcoming book, The Upside of Your Dark Side, explores the utility of negative emotions like anger, anxiety, and sadness:

“With an appreciation of our entire psychological toolkit, we become whole—which allows us to climb the highest peaks and handle the deepest valleys.”

In The Eve Of…, I’m exploring how we experience these ‘deep valleys’ as internal, nebulous, and de-centered spaces.

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Art Competition Odds

Art Competition Odds: Climate March Design Contest

Avaaz.org received over 400 applicants’ submissions for its Climate March Design Contest. They announced two winning submissions and 18 finalists.

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Winning artists and finalists comprise about 1:20, or 5% of applicants.

Winning artists comprise about 1:200, or 0.5% of applicants.

See all Art Competition Odds.

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Art Competition Odds

Art Competition Odds: 2014 Art Moves Billboard Art Festival

The 2014 Art Moves Billboard Art Festival received 566 applications for ten exhibition spots, and one cash prize.

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Selected artists comprise about 1:56, or 1.7% of applicants.

The cash prize winner comprised 1:566, or 0.17% of applicants.

See all Art Competition Odds.

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