Meta-Practice
How to focus in the age of distractions // Source: www.learningfundamentals.com.au

How to focus in the age of distractions // Source: http://www.learningfundamentals.com.au

Like most people, I struggle with staying focused and exerting self-control over my mobile device addiction. I love this mind map by Jane Genovese, promoting offline time and space for reflection and identifying priorities. It’s a great reminder to connect with people, stretch more, and use site-blockers like StayFocusd—I’ll also look into Freedom and Anti-Social (I’d love a site blocker for my phone).

Next, I’m gonna try making my studio an gadget-free space, and leave my mobile at the door. Wish me luck!

How to focus in the age of distractions

Aside
Techniques

Guess who uses the same system as I for installations pinned to walls! My idol, Jim Hodges, as seen in this video promo for Hodge’s exhibition at the Walker and the Dallas Museum of Art.

Still from Jim Hodges, Give More Than You Take, filmed and edited by Ted Forbes.

Still from Jim Hodges, Give More Than You Take, filmed and edited by Ted Forbes.

To simplify the installation of my ribbon texts, I lay poly sheeting over the ribbons and outline them in permanent marker. I use the sheet to hold the work in place for transit and storage, and as a guide for installation. It’s something I figured out after installing the hard way several times. It’s neat when a method is validated via use by an artist you admire.

PreparatorCraft: Poly sheet guides for installations pinned to walls

Aside
Citizenship

In response to President Obama’s recent, not-so-cool counterexample of art history majors, SFMOMA solicited responses along the theme of #ArtDegreesWork:

Did your degree in art history help you start a company? Get a museum job? Teach in a classroom? Share your story!

A lovely affirmation of what we artists and art history majors already know. Check it out here.

#ArtDegreesWork

Aside
Sights
Mathilde Ter Heijne,  Woman to Go

Mathilde Ter Heijne, Woman to Go

This is an interesting premise for a show: postcard reproductions of early Daguerreotypes of unidentified women, with texts about recognized women, given away for free. Increasing the visibility of women through this act of generosity/ distribution. More info at the artist’s site.

It’s on view at Jack Hanley Gallery in NYC. Nice to see non-commercial projects at a commercial gallery.

Mathilde Ter Heijne: Woman to Go @ Jack Hanley Gallery

Aside