Meta-Practice

Home Studio 360

In a recent post, I urged working artists to value ourselves and our practices independent of commercial validation.

It’s easier to say than do. Here’s a case in point:

Because I have a hang-up that I might be perceived as a less serious artist since I work from home, I’ve never posted pics of my current studio.

Until now. 

Studio panorama. Pretty nice to have light and fresh air. The windows face out to a covered porch, where I've done a little bit of woodworking.

Studio panorama. Pretty nice to have light and fresh air. The windows face out to a covered porch, where I’ve done a little bit of woodworking.

I'm sewing the VIA signal flag project these days. I put up some ribbons on the walls so I can pin things up without constantly making new holes in the walls. Leftover insulation foam from a packing project has been turned into another pinboard for swatches (at left).

I’m sewing the VIA signal flag project these days. I put up some ribbons on the walls so I can pin things up without constantly making new holes in the walls. Leftover insulation foam from a packing project has been turned into another pinboard for swatches (at left).

I'm guessing this map is from the 1970s. It's fun to think about all the places I've yet to visit in this huge, amazing country.

I’m guessing this map is from the 1970s. It’s fun to think about all the places I’ve yet to visit in this huge, amazing country.

As far as I'm concerned, books, artist's tape, and colorful pens are non-negotiable.

Pegboard’s irresistible promise of organization.

As far as I'm concerned, books, artist's tape, and colorful pens are non-negotiable.

As far as I’m concerned, books, artist’s tape, and colorful pens are non-negotiable.

Though I would rather have a studio outside the home, I have to admit—the convenience of a home studio is a big plus. Working from home, I’ll never have to eat a Trader Joe’s MRI or bodega junk food. I’ll never have to commute just to get the dimensions of a work of art or pick up a ruler. Other artists’ dusts, fumes, music and garbage are non-issues. Late at night, I don’t have to get creeped out in an empty building or desolate neighborhood. I get to use a full kitchen and clean bathroom! I never suffer the consequences of leaving materials or references at “home,” and bringing a fan or air conditioner, or scarf or jacket, takes all of 30 seconds.

According to the W.A.G.E. survey, 45.8% of artist-respondents reported that they don’t rent studios outside of their own residences, either. So I’m far from alone in managing my resources this way. My fears were based on assumptions of what a serious artist should be doing. But as Creative Capital mentors have said,

Artists! Don’t should all over yourself.

I’d love a bigger, more flexible studio one day, but for now, my little home studio is not too bad—and now that I think about it, it’s pretty great. I’ll try to take my own advice and Be Here Now.

WF made me this awesome trophy.

W made me this awesome trophy. Be here now!

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One thought on “Home Studio 360

  1. I definitely can see advantages of a home studio and all your complaints about separate studios resonate. I would add one advantage to the separate studio though: For myself, and my wife (both of us artists with studios outside the home) Having a studio has meant prolonged contact with other artists. I don’t go to a lot of openings, I find the social pressure exhausting, so having a shared studio has been a big part in my continued engagement with a larger community if artists.

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