Research

Happiness Infographics

Via ET and FlowingData.com:

'life is simple' by Moritz Resl

Moritz Resl, Life is simple, digital art print, 16x16 inches / 42x42 cm, Open edition.

Source: MoritzResl.net

I like these infographics, even if they are a bit simplistic, they’re upbeat.

Are you happy?

By H34DUP and David Meiklejohn. Source: blog.h34dup.com

A quibble: humans adapt to positive emotions quite readily, as Phillip Zimbardo and John Boyd wrote in The Time Paradox. So the advice “Keep doing what you’re doing” would probably maintain happiness, but only for so long. Humans also need novelty, variation, and new challenges.

Cheap and Cheerful #5

Christine Wong Yap, Cheap and Cheerful #5, 2009, neon and glitter pen, 11.625 x 7.75 inches / 29.5 x 45 cm. Produced in the Breathe Residency at Chinese Arts Centre.

Plus, for you-know-whats and giggles (unless you’re an information graphics designer for which chartjunk is a curse upon the earth of Biblical proportions):

The usually illustrious Christoph Nieman’s illustration for Portfolio.com:

Illustration by Christoph Niemann

Illustration by Christoph Niemann for article about personal wealth and happiness on Portfolio.com

Standard
Art & Development

Coffee cups, and military strategy

I am often told that my art work is about design, which surprises me. I rarely think about design as I’m making my work, and further, I couldn’t make work in a design-free vacuum. Design is the matrix of material forms in our lives. Typography is the very medium of visual-textual communication. As one would apply formal and conceptual considerations to materials, so too should typography be thoughtfully selected. Materials provide visual, textual, material content, as well as design meaning.

The importance of design ought be self-evident. This week, the New York Times provided positive and negative reminders to appreciate design.


“Leslie Buck, Designer of Iconic Coffee Cup, Dies at 87″
Margalit Fox NYTimes.com, April 29, 2010


“We Have Met the Enemy and He Is PowerPoint”
Elisabeth Bumiller, NYTimes.com, April 26, 2010

Above: An epic fail of an infographic. (Unless the point was to convey “quagmire.”)

Standard