Artists

Amalia Pica

In my post-work, just-about-closing-time dash through The Ungovernables at the New Museum, I enjoyed Amalia Pica’s works. Looking deeper at the Argentinean artist’s ouvre, there’s still more that resonates with me and my practice—interests in celebration, simple forms, and the futility of language.

At Ungovernables:

Installation view of the Ungovernables at the New Museum, NY. Foreground/left: Amalia Pica, Venn diagrams (under the spotlight). 2011 Installation with spotlights, motion sensors and text. // Source: NewMuseum.org.

Installation view of the Ungovernables at the New Museum, NY. Foreground/left: Amalia Pica, Venn diagrams (under the spotlight). 2011 Installation with spotlights, motion sensors and text. // Source: NewMuseum.org.

Amalia Pica, Venn diagrams (under the spotlight). 2011 Installation with spotlights, motion sensors and text. // Source: rolu.terapad.com.

Amalia Pica, Venn diagrams (under the spotlight). 2011 Installation with spotlights, motion sensors and text. // Source: rolu.terapad.com.

Amalia Pica, Eavesdropping (Version #2, large), 2011, found drinking glasses, glue. Collection of James Keith Brown and Eric Deifenbach, New York. // Source: Flavorwire.com.

Amalia Pica, Eavesdropping (Version #2, large), 2011, found drinking glasses, glue. Collection of James Keith Brown and Eric Deifenbach, New York. // Source: Flavorwire.com.

More projects:

Amalia Pica, Strangers, 2008. Tableau vivant performed by two actors that never met before, holding a string of bunting for hours at time. Source: Artlicks.com.

Amalia Pica, Strangers, 2008. Tableau vivant performed by two actors that never met before, holding a string of bunting for hours at time. Source: Artlicks.com.

I love Strangers. What a brilliant project. I often think about how a work of art mediates relationships, and this project is a fantastic staging of such physical presence yet mediated distancing.

Amalia Pica’s forthcoming exhibition at Chisenhale (London)

elaborates upon Pica’s ongoing interest in the social act of listening, sites of celebration and technologies of mass communication.

(via Artlicks)
Amalia Pica, Strangers, 2008. Tableau vivant performed by two actors that never met before, holding a string of bunting for hours at time. // Source: Universes-in-universes.org.

Amalia Pica, Strangers, 2008. Tableau vivant performed by two actors that never met before, holding a string of bunting for hours at time. (Foreground. Christopher Wool paintings in background.) // Photo: Haupt & Binder // Source: Universes-in-universes.org.

Unsurprisingly, Marc Foxx Gallery in Los Angeles represents Pica. I’ve followed this gallery for years thanks to Foxx’s tastes in subtle, conceptual work.

Amalia Pica, Some of that Colour #4, 2011. Paper flags, drained paper flag dye on watercolor paper, chair. 78 x 155 x 60.5 inches. // Source: MarcFoxx.com.

Amalia Pica, Some of that Colour #4, 2011. Paper flags, drained paper flag dye on watercolor paper, chair. 78 x 155 x 60.5 inches. // Source: MarcFoxx.com.

Amalia Pica, Spinning Trajectories - #1, 2009. Felt pen spinning top on graph paper. Individual works, various sizes. // Source: MarcFoxx.com.

Amalia Pica, Spinning Trajectories – #1, 2009. Felt pen spinning top on graph paper. Individual works, various sizes. // Source: MarcFoxx.com.

Amalia Pica, Spinning Trajectories - #4, 2009. Felt pen spinning top on graph paper. Individual works, various sizes. // Source: MarcFoxx.com.

Amalia Pica, Spinning Trajectories – #4, 2009. Felt pen spinning top on graph paper. Individual works, various sizes. // Source: MarcFoxx.com.

I love the simplicity of these gestures—a variant of a similar impulse behind Ceal Floyer’s Ink on Paper series.

Amalia Pica, Under the spotlight (white on white), 2011. Installation with spotlight, motion sensor, paper and paint. Source: MarcFoxx.com.

Amalia Pica, Under the spotlight (white on white), 2011. Installation with spotlight, motion sensor, paper and paint. Source: MarcFoxx.com.

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